The Lion King of Kings.

Christianity, Religion


“Then Jacob called his sons and said, ‘Gather around, and I will tell you what will happen to you in the days to come.

Come together and listen, sons of Jacob;

listen to your father Israel…’” Genesis 49:1-2.

“Judah is a young lion—

my son, you return from the kill.

He crouches; he lies down like a lion

or a lioness—who dares to rouse him?

The scepter will not depart from Judah

or the staff from between his feet

until He to whom they belong comes

and the obedience of the peoples belongs to Him.” Genesis 49:9-10.

We find a gripping scene presented in Genesis 49; it is one which is moving in both its emotion and in its scope and importance to the rest of Scripture. We find the last patriarch, Jacob–who had been renamed Israel by this point in his life–on his deathbed. He was living in Egypt, with his twelve sons, including his long-lost son, Joseph. Israel had come quite a long way, both in geography and also in his spiritual life. It had been many years since he tricked his brother Esau into giving him his birthright, and then stole Esau’s blessing as the firstborn. Many years had passed since Jacob wrestled all night with the Angel of the Lord and had his name changed to Israel. Now he was an old man, full of years, preparing to return to the land and be with his fathers.

The story of Jacob/Israel allows us to see God’s promise to Abraham take a significant step forward. Jacob was Abraham’s grandson; the once childless patriarch, Abraham, left his home and family and followed after God when He called him to do so. Abraham believed in the promise God made to him– that God would make him the father of many–and that from Abraham all the nations would be blessed. By the time we find Israel in Egypt on his deathbed, that family had already begun to blossom.

On one note, the scene found in Genesis is touching. We see here a dying father calling to his beside his sons so that he might give them his last bits of wisdom and advice; it was the time for Jacob/Israel to leave his last will and testament. Undoubtedly, this was a bittersweet moment, one filled with immense emotion. This family, members of which had long been separated from one another, had finally been reunited. Now, the family would once again be divided, this time by death and the grave. 

As Jacob/Israel speaks to his sons, we see something interesting in his words. He begins to offer up a blessing upon each of them, something that was customary for an ailing father to do before his death. But, in the pronouncement of the blessings, Jacob/Israel says that he will tell his sons about what will “happen to them in days to come.” The phrase “days to come,” is significant–the Hebrew word from which it is translated is “achariyth” (אַחֲרִית). This word can also be translated as “the end of days,” meaning at the end of time. It is also interesting to point out that “achariyth” is the corresponding opposite word to the phrase that is found at the very outset of Genesis; there we find the word “re’shiyth” (בְּרֵאשִׁית), which means “the beginning.” In the very first book of Scripture, we see the account of how the world began, we find at the close of that same book a prophecy about what will occur at the end of time.

The fact that Jacob/Israel is referring to things that will occur at the end of time is a clue that the events detailed in his blessing upon his sons will come into fruition long after all of them have died. From this, we can intuit that this is not merely a blessing that Jacob/Israel is giving to his sons; instead, it is a prophecy from God about events of the end of days.

Jacob’s prophetic blessing to his fourth son, Judah, is the most significant of the blessings. Judah would become the head of the family, a right that his older three brothers had forfeited through various actions. Judah, who is loyal and brave and valourous, like a lion, is told that his descendants would be revered, and they would be kings over their kinsmen. The line of Judah would rule over the children of Israel until the end of days, at which time, a special ruler from Judah would appear. This prophetic figure would be a king above other kings, for the scepter and staff that the kings of Judah hold rightly belong to this future promised Lion King of Kings. To this promised future king of kings belonged the obedience of all the nations. This promised coming Lion King of Kings would rule over not only Israel but all the peoples of the world.

The arrival of this promised king would be marked by agricultural abundance and bounty that had never before been seen. Grapevines would grow so thick that the Lion King of Kings would be able to use their branches as a hitching post for his donkey steed. There would be so many grapes and wine that he would use them to wash his garments. This agricultural bounty is supposed to call to mind images of Eden, where the land yielded its produce freely and without toil. 

This connection to Eden helps us to see that the arrival of the Lion King of Kings signals a breaking of the curse upon the land that was handed down as a result of the Fall in the Garden. If the Lion King of Kings is able to break the curse upon the land, then he must also be the one who crushes and defeats the Serpent. If the Lion King of Kings is the one who overcomes the Serpent, then he is also the one who brings blessing to all the world, as God promised Abraham.

In Jacob/Israel’s prophetic blessing upon Judah, we see the promises made to Eve and to Abraham narrowed just a bit more. God told Eve her promised avenger, the Snake Crusher, would be from her seed–that he would be human. Abraham was promised that his offspring would bless the world, and here Judah is told it is his line that would bring this blessing. God’s plan to save and redeem humanity took another step forward, and all would be waiting for the Lion King to come and free them from the curses.

Many years later, that very distant descendant of Judah would be born in a small town called Bethlehem. He would be from the line of a great king, and the heavens would burst open to proclaim his birth. He would grow up into a man who taught others how to live as God desires. But most importantly, that man–Jesus Christ–would willingly give His life to atone for the sins of the world, to redeem humanity, and to bring blessing to the nations. Jesus Christ is the Lion King of Kings. He rose again from the grave, and He is coming once more to bring those who trust in Him into His messianic kingdom.

Bend your knees before the Lion King of King. Submit to Him and be washed in His blood.

Artwork: “Lion of Judah,” Janet Latham–Fesmire Art Studios, 2015. (http://janetfes.blogspot.com/)