Work Hard for the Rest.

Christian Living, Christianity, Hebrews, Religion
“Rest” 1956 Reginald Brill

“Therefore, while the promise to enter His rest remains, let us fear that none of you should miss it. For we also have received the good news just as they did; but the message they heard did not benefit them, since they were not united with those who heard it in faith.” Hebrews 4:1-2

In Hebrews 4, we see the author continue using the example of Israel’s failure in the wilderness to underscore the importance of being steadfast in our belief. Just like Israel, we have also had the “good news” of God’s rest promised to us, but the author tells us that Israel’s failure was that they did not have faith in what they heard. This lesson is an important one for us to learn: hearing the good news preached is useless if we do not believe what we hear. The author of Hebrews wants us to understand that we must have both belief and faith.  While this sounds simple enough, what does it mean?

Today we use the words “belief” and “faith” in ways that are very different from the way we see them used in the Bible. We might use either term to describe something that we think might happen or what we want to happen. Still, neither of these uses reflects Biblical belief or faith. In the Bible, to believe in something means that you put the entirety of your hope, trust, and confidence in that thing. It means you believe in that thing with the fullness of your being. When we say we believe in Christ, what we are honestly saying is that we have put all of our hope, confidence, and trust for our salvation in Him. Faith is related to this; faith is the living out of the belief we profess. Biblical faith involves living a life that reflects the things we believe. It means living in a way that shows we truly do mean what we say we believe. Faith is putting our belief into practice; it means we walk the walk, and we talk the talk. As we all know, if you want to know what a person truly thinks or believes, you watch how they act. The same is true for us as well; if you want to see if a person truly believes in Christ, you see if their actions reflect that belief.

The author of Hebrews calls on us to work hard to enter the rest that God has prepared for us. We must be diligent in living out the belief we profess to have. We must commit every day to live by faith so that we do not develop evil hearts and fall into unbelief as Israel did. 

The author also reminds us that God’s word is living and active, and is sharper than a double-edged sword. When we hear God’s word, when we read the Bible, those words are acting on us. They are piercing us to our souls and searching the thoughts and motives of our hearts. God knows if our talk matches our walk; we cannot hide anything from Him. If we are hiding things in our hearts, if we are holding on to things that we should not be holding on to, God will use His word to convict us. We cannot ignore this conviction. We must not harden our hearts to it. God does not convict us so that He can shame us or belittle us; He convicts us so that we can let go of the things that are leading us away from Him and so we can repent of those things. The conviction we feel from God is how He helps us stay on the path that leads to the rest that He wants us to have.

Loved Ones, we must honestly look at ourselves and be sure that our walk matches our talk. We must acknowledge and listen to the conviction we might feel when confronted with God’s word. We must examine our hearts and allow God to rid them of the things that will lead us away from Him. We must work hard each day to faithfully live out our belief in Christ. If we do this, we will one day enjoy the rest that God has prepared for us.

The Cost of Unbelief.

Christianity, Hebrews, Religion

“Take care, brothers, lest there be in any of you an evil, unbelieving heart, leading you to fall away from the living God.”
‭‭Hebrews‬ ‭3:12‬ ‭

In Hebrews 3:1-6, we read how the author of Hebrews argued for Jesus’ superiority to Moses. Beginning in verse 7, however, we see a shift in the author’s focus. The author takes a detour from discussing Israel’s greatest leader, Moses, and instead discusses Israel’s greatest failure. This shift is intentional. The author uses the cautionary tale of Israel’s sin in the wilderness to highlight the importance of holding fast to our belief in Christ.

Once again, we see the author of Hebrews dig deeply into the Old Testament to present scripture to support the importance of belief. In verses 7-11, the author quotes from Psalm 95. This particular psalm is a re-telling of the story of Israel’s rebellion and refusal to enter the Promised Land. We find this story first presented in Numbers 14. To understand the message of Psalm 95, we must understand the events of Numbers 14. So let’s take a moment to discuss those events.

In Numbers 14, we find the Israelites and Moses on the border of the Promised Land. They had come through the Exodus. They spent a year at Sinai. Now, they are on the threshold of entering into the land that God reserved for them. Moses sent twelve spies into the land to check it out, and the spies returned to Moses after forty days. Ten of the spies did not think that Israel could take the land. They did not believe that God would keep His promise to give them the land, even though He had already repeatedly told Israel that He would. These ten evil spies convinced the rest of Israel not to go into the Promised Land, and Israel rebelled against God and Moses. Israel rebelled and fell into unbelief, and they fell away from God. The results of this rebellion were disastrous for Israel. They would not be allowed to go into the Promised Land. They would have to wander in the desert for 40 years until the rebellious generation died. This is the story we see re-told in Psalm 95, and this is the story that the author of Hebrews uses to drive home the importance of belief.

The author introduces the quote from Psalm 95 in an interesting way, saying that the psalm’s words are the words of the Holy Spirit. The author of Hebrews says that the Holy Spirit is currently speaking these words today through the Scriptures. When we read the Bible, we hear God’s Spirit speaking to us. What is it that the Spirit is saying to us in Psalm 95? It is an urgent plea to learn from the tragic mistake of Israel’s rebellion and to not fall into the same trap. The Spirit tells us to listen to God’s voice today and not to harden our hearts as Israel did. 

In verse 12, the author adds another plea, one that calls upon us not to beware of having evil hearts. The word used there for “evil” can mean “bad” or “wicked,” but it can also mean “full of toil, labor, or annoyance.” We learn from this that the first step in falling into unbelief and rebelling against God is having a heart that is full of ingratitude. To combat developing such evil hearts, the author calls upon believers to encourage and exhort one another every day. The Greek word the author uses is parakaleo, which means “to encourage or admonish.” We are to encourage and, if need be, admonish our brothers and sisters every day so that they might not develop evil hearts. We are to keep each other focused upon God and not upon the toil and strife of this world.

The author presents the story of Israel’s rebellion against God to highlight to us the importance of holding on to our belief in Christ. Israel broke their covenant agreement with God and forfeited their right to enter the Promised Land as the result of that rebellion. If their rebellion against God and Moses was so severe, how much more would the punishment be for those who rebel against the one who is greater than Moses–Christ? If they lost their right to enter the Promised Land, what might we lose if we fall away into unbelief? 

We must learn from this cautionary tale, and we must hold tightly to the belief that we have placed in Christ. We cannot be distracted by the toil of this world, nor can we become ungrateful. We must focus on the spiritual health of our hearts, and we must be committed to encouraging our brothers and sisters to do the same thing. Though we are in the wilderness today, the Promised Land is just before us. We must be wholly devoted to following Christ so that we might enter into that special place that He has prepared for us.

Artwork: “Wanderer in the storm,” by Julius von Leypold, 1835

Turn Your Eyes to Jesus.

Christian Living, Christianity, Hebrews

In Hebrews 3, the author of Hebrews begins explaining Jesus’ superiority to Moses. This was no small undertaking, and this point was one that had to be explained. The purpose of the Book of Hebrews was to explain how Christ was superior to the Old Testament figures and traditions, and there was no way to argue this point without dealing with the issue of Jesus’ superiority to Moses. 

For us today, this appears to be an easy argument to make. We have grown up steeped in the Christian tradition, we know that Jesus is the Son of God and that He is God Incarnate. It is evident to us that Jesus is superior to Moses. However, those who had grown up steeped in the Hebrew faith had been taught to revere Moses. He was the most important figure in the Scriptures, second only to God. Moses was the great redeemer and lawgiver. He led Israel out of slavery in Egypt. He was the mediator, the middleman, between God and Israel. It was Moses who pleaded Israel’s case for forgiveness every time they sinned and faced God’s punishment. For the Hebrew people, Moses was the template, the model, for the Messiah. Moses was also the standard by which all other Hebrew prophets and leaders would be measured.

The author of Hebrews begins this argument in verse 1 by telling the readers to “consider Jesus, the apostle and high priest of our confession.” Here the author used the Greek word katanoeo, which means “to look upon” or “to focus upon.” After we are led to salvation by Christ and brought into the family of God, our focus and attention must be upon Christ. We must look to Him for our guidance and hope. We must do this because He is both our apostle and high priest. The word “apostle” means “one who is sent forth;” we might today use the word representative or diplomat. Christ is an apostle because He was sent here by God to be God’s representative on Earth. Christ was God’s diplomat to humanity. 

Christ was made an apostle to humanity so that He might be our high priest. He would be the one who would go into God’s presence and make atonement on our behalf. He would be our mediator, the one who pleaded our case, to God. In doing this, Christ would free us from slavery to sin and death.

  When we understand what Christ did for humanity, we see how He is superior to Moses. While Moses redeemed Israel, Jesus redeemed humanity. Moses taught Israel how to be God’s people, Christ taught the world how to be the people of God. God spoke to Moses as a friend, but God spoke to Jesus as a son. All the work that Moses did for Israel pointed forward to the more incredible work that Jesus would do for all the world.

The work that Christ did as the apostle and high priest of our confession brought us into the house–the family–of God. Christ gives us hope and confidence that we can rejoice in and take pride in. Through Jesus, we have the assurance of salvation and the forgiveness of our sins. But, as the author tells us, we must hold hast, hold tightly, to this hope and confidence. We cannot be tempted, as some of the Hebrew believers were, to go back into the old ways and traditions. Instead, we must cling to Christ, we must focus on Him alone, and hold to the hope that He gives us.

Christ is worthy of our trust and our hope. He alone can save us. Why then are we so slow to put all our hope and trust and confidence in Him? Why do we seek to put our hope and confidence in other people or institutions? The Hebrews made the mistake of believing their traditions and heritage and nationality could save them. Often, we too make this mistake. We put our hope and confidence in our families, in our traditions, in our heritage, in our nationality. These things, however, are insignificant. These things cannot save us. They do not make us the people of God. Only faith in Christ can save us. Only His blood can make us God’s people. So why are we not trusting Him?

Turn your eyes to Jesus. He alone can save you. Focus upon Christ, place the entirety of your hope and confidence in Him alone, and watch the things of this world grow strangely dim in the light of His glory and grace.

One of Us.

Christianity, Hebrews, Religion

“For since He Himself was tested and has suffered, He is able to help those who are tested.” Hebrews 2:18

Following the word of warning that is given in the first four verses of Hebrews 2, the author spends the remainder of chapter two making a case for Christ’s humanity. The author explains to the reader why Christ had to come to earth in the form of a human. This is a significant undertaking; the belief that Christ was God in the form of a human is one of the central beliefs of our faith. Here in Hebrews 2, the author explains to us why this had to be so. In unpacking and explaining this crucial point, the author presents three reasons why Christ had to come into the world as a human. Let’s explore the author’s points.

1. Christ had to be human to recapture our lost glory and honor, and to defeat death (5-9) 

The author begins explaining why Christ had to be a human by reminding us of humanity’s place within creation. To do this, the author of Hebrews quotes from Psalm 8. In this particular psalm, the psalmist writes about the glory of creation, and also of the remarkable fact that God placed humanity in charge of creation. The psalmist refers back to Genesis 1, where God commissioned humanity to subdue and rule over creation. It was God’s original intention for mankind to rule creation along with Him; we were meant to be God’s regents over the created world. God made us to be rulers; He created us and gave us dominion over all the world.

But there is a problem: creation is not under our control. Sin and the Fall ruined this. Everywhere we look, we see evidence that we have no control, no authority over anything. This was the situation that Jesus entered in. He came into the world as one of us, as one who is human. But we now see Jesus crowned with glory and honor. In His complete obedience to God, in His total submission to the Father, Christ became the first human to recapture the glory and honor that we lost in the Fall. He recaptured our lost authority, and He used that authority to defeat death for us. But Christ did not defeat His enemy–death–in the way we would imagine someone with power and authority would defeat an enemy. Christ did not battle death, He did not overpower death, He did not force death into submission. Christ defeated death by allowing it to destroy Him. Christ defeated death by fully submitting to the Father and completely trusting in God to restore Him to life. In doing this, Christ became our model for how humanity was supposed to live, and he showed us how His followers, the new humanity, are supposed to live.

2. Christ had to be human to become our “trailblazer” and “hero” (10-13)

In verse 10, the author tells us that it was fitting for Christ to be the one to come and recapture for us our lost glory and honor because He was the one who had given it to us in the first place. This fact makes Christ especially qualified to be the one to lead us back to our former position and relationship with God. The author also introduces us to a significant word in verse 10; depending upon your chosen translation, the word made be translated as “author,” “captain,” “source,” or “leader.” Each of these words hints at the meaning of the original Greek word, archagos, that the author used. Archagos means “leader, pioneer, trailblazer,” and in some ancient Greek writing, it is also used to mean “hero.” By defeating death and reclaiming our lost glory and honor, Christ becomes our hero, and He becomes our trailblazer. He leads us on the path back to God; He shows us the way. In showing us the way to salvation, Christ is also leading us back tot he family of God–back into His family. He leads us back home, and when we become His followers, He calls us His brothers and sisters.

3. Christ had to be human to know what it’s like to be us (14-18)

The author tells us that Christ is the perfect, the complete hero for us because He has suffered just as we do. He knows temptation, He knows trials, He knows pain and hardship. While Christ was on the earth, He lived a fully human life, and He experienced everything that we experience as humans. Christ, however, overcame all His temptation and suffering; He lived a totally sinless life. This allows Christ to be our perfect High Priest. He could offer atonement for us because He knows firsthand the trials and sins we struggle with. He was able to go to God on our behalf and bring us forgiveness for those sins. Christ had to be human so that He could know what it is like to be like us; so that He could know how to minister for us, and how to minister to us. He knows our pain and our struggles firsthand, and He knows how to help us when we are struggling with our pain, suffering, and sin.

Christ had to come to earth as one of us. He had to live as one of us so that He could save us from our sins and from ourselves. He knows everything that we endure; He knows what it is like to be tempted, to be tested, to hurt, to suffer, to be alone. There is nothing that we can endure that He has not experienced for Himself. He came to the earth so that He could lift us up out of the filth that we have sunken down into, and so that He could restore us to the glory and honor that He created us for. He came to show us that we were meant to live better, that we were designed to live for so much more than what we are currently living for. He came as one of us so that in those times when we feel alone–when we feel as if we have no hope or nothing to live for–we can remember that our Hero has battled the same sorrows, and has overcome them. We can remember that our Creator has felt the same things and that He is offering us His hand to lead us on the path back to Him. Christ came to earth to take all of the darkness humanity brought upon itself–all the hurt, shame, grief, sorrow, dishonor, sin– and that He took these things upon Himself. He did this so that He could shine His light into the darkness and illuminate for us the path back to Him.

You are not alone, Loved Ones. Our Hero is in the trenches with us. Christ knows what you are enduring. Take His hand, let Him guide you. Trust in Him fully and completely. Live as the new humanity that He calls you to be, and let Him restore you to the glory and honor that we lost.

Artwork: “Ecce Homo,” by Antatoly Shumkin

Superior to the Angels

Christianity, Hebrews

“After making purification for sins, He sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high. So He became higher in rank than the angels, just as the name He inherited is superior to theirs.” Hebrews 1:3-4

The author of Hebrews spends the majority of chapter one explaining how Christ is superior to the angels. This may seem like an unusual argument for the author to have to make; we have no issues today understanding that Jesus is superior to all the beings in heaven. We know that Christ is the Creator and that the angels are part of His creation. As such, it is easy for us to see that Christ is superior.

The early Jewish believers, however, did not have the benefit of 2,000 years of Christian theology and thinking to aid them, as we do today. In fact, they were trying to make sense of thousands of years of their own religious tradition and teachings in light of the Gospel and God’s new revelation through Jesus. The early believers were the ones who were having to figure out Christian theology as they went along. The author of Hebrews wrote this letter, in part, to help the early believers do just that.

The claim that Jesus was superior to the angels was a necessary claim for the author to make. There had long been a belief within Judaism that the angels were the peak of God’s creation. It was believed that angels were superior to humanity because the angels resided in Heaven with God and served Him. Due to this close proximity to God, it was thought that the angels had to be better than humans; they would not be allowed so close to God if they were not. There was another reason for this lofty view of angels. Throughout the Bible, especially the Old Testament, there are numerous episodes in which God communicated messages to certain men and women, and these messages were communicated through angels. Time and time again, God would send an angel to tell people a message that God needed them to hear. This led, over time, people to think that angles must be important–for if they weren’t, then why would God use them to do such important work?

This is the mindset that the author of Hebrews was writing to correct. The author needed the Jewish believers in Christ to understand that Christ is God. Jesus is not less than God, He is not inferior to God, but that He is God. Jesus was the incarnation of God; He was God in the form of a man. The author also needed these believers to understand that when Christ became a man, He did not lose any of His divinity. Jesus was not 50% man, and 50% God. In taking on flesh, Christ did not put away His power and authority. As hard as it is for us to comprehend, Christ was both fully man and fully God. The author of Hebrews wanted the Hebrew Christians to understand this so that they could see that Jesus is the God that the angels serve and worship. Once they grasped that, they would realize that Christ is superior to the angels.

After explaining how Christ is superior to the angels, the author of Hebrews then gives a word of warning in chapter 2:1-4. The author warns the readers to pay closer attention to the words that Christ is speaking to us now than had bee paid to the previous messages from God. The message being spoken to us now is superior to the old messages, and because of that, the believers had to be all the more diligent in listening and obeying it. If the message was ignored, they would “drift away” from this important message of salvation and would float away into judgment.

Though the tradition of believing the angels were superior to Christ may seem silly to us today, it was a real issue that had to be addressed and corrected. The core issue was that the Hebrew believers were coming from a tradition that put an unnecessary focus on the angels. They were focusing on beings who were not meant to be focused upon. After all, the word “angel” comes from the Greek word angelos, which simply means “messenger,” and that is all that the angels are: they are God’s messengers. They are not beings that should be revered or worshipped. 

The mistake that the Hebrew believers were making was that they were paying more attention to the messengers than to the One who sent the messengers. This is an issue we still wrestle with today. While we might understand who Christ is, we often make the same mistake of focusing more on the messengers that are sent to us than on Christ. We have our preferred theological views and systems and approaches, and we tend to focus only upon making Scripture fit our understanding of what it should say. Often we prefer to listen to how other individuals interpret the Bible instead of allowing the Biblical texts to speak for themselves. 

This highlights the danger that the author of Hebrews hinted at.  We must pay close attention to what Christ says to us and not only listen to what people tell us He said. If we only listen to the interpretations of other people, we run the genuine risk of drifting away wherever the currents of bad teaching carry us. We must, instead, focus upon Christ and listen diligently and intently to what He says to us. We must pay close attention to Him and not allow other voices to distract us. We must listen to the message that is sent to us by Him, and not focus on the messengers who brought it to us.

Artwork: Detail of an Angel by Giotto, c. 1300

Long Ago and in Various Ways

Christianity, Hebrews, Religion

“Long ago God spoke to the fathers by the prophets at different times and in different ways. In these last days, He has spoken to us by His Son. God has appointed Him heir of all things and made the universe through Him. The Son is the radiance of God’s glory and the exact expression of His nature, sustaining all things by His powerful word. After making purification for sins, He sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high.” —Hebrews 1:1-3

Hebrews is one of the most mysterious books of the Bible. We do not know who wrote it, we do not know when it was written, nor do we know who the book was written to. An early church leader, Origen of Alexandria, said that there is much about Hebrews that “is known only to God.” That statement is entirely accurate.

Despite what we do now know about Hebrews, this book is still one of the most theologically rich books within the Bible. No other book does a more complete job of taking the teachings of the Old Testament and explaining how those teachings are fulfilled by Jesus Christ. In fact, that is the central message of Hebrews–showing that Jesus has fulfilled and is superior to the teachings of the Old Testament. The author of Hebrews goes to great lengths to prove this point.

The author begins this argument with one of the most poetic lines contained in Scripture. In that first verse, we are reminded that God has been speaking to humanity since the beginning of time itself. Not only has God been speaking to us, but He has also revealed, little by little, His plan for redeeming the world. These revelations came through the prophets, first Abraham, then Moses, and numerous others, and each revelation built upon the previous one. Each message sent by God gave His people a clearer understanding of how they are to live as God’s people. In the eyes of the Hebrew people, God’s ultimate revelation was to Moses upon Mount Sinai. It was at that time and place that the Lord gave Moses and Israel the Law. As far as the Hebrews were concerned, there had been no message from God, no revelation, that surpassed the giving of the Law.

The author of Hebrews, however, begs to differ. In verse 2, the author tells us that there has been a new message given and that this message was so important that it had to be delivered by God’s Son. No person, no prophet, was capable of delivering this message, because it would stand has the ultimate revelation of God’s plan for salvation. The message spoken to us by the Son would be superior to all of the previous messages spoken by the prophets. 

To show us just how important this message is, the author of Hebrews presents several points, seven to be exact, proving just how special the Son is. The author tells us that Jesus–the Son–is the heir of all things, that God made all things in the universe through the Him, that the He is the radiance of God’s glory, that the He is the exact expression of God’s nature, that the He sustains all things in the universe through His word, that the He has made atonement for us, and He has sat down at the God’s right hand.  

Each of these characteristics of Christ is important. Each point presented by the author of Hebrews is grounded in the Old Testament scriptures. The author uses an interesting word when telling us that Christ is the exact expression of God’s nature. The word there in Greek is charaktayr, from which we get “character.” This word, charaktayr, means “exact copy.” By using this word, the author wants us to understand that Christ is just that; He is the exact physical copy of God’s nature. 

The author also gives us two important clues about Christ’s role in the world. First, it is mentioned that Christ has made atonement for us. This points to Christ’s role as our High Priest. In Leviticus, God outlines all the various ways in which the High Priest can make atonement for himself and for the people. As believers in Christ, we know that He performed this same act for us upon the cross. Secondly, we are reminded of Christ’s kingship, and that Christ does rule the universe at the right hand of God. Christ is not only the King of Israel; He is the King of Kings and Lord of Lords.  We are told all of this information because the author of Hebrews wants us to understand just exactly who is speaking to us today. Christ is not just another prophet; He is God. The message Christ brings to us is one that we must listen to; we cannot afford to ignore it or disregard it. Christ’s message is one of hope, salvation, and redemption, but we may only experience these things if we listen to Him. So, are we doing just that? Are we listening to the message Christ has for us?

Artwork: “The Prophet and the Angel,” Marc Chagall, 1979.

By Faith.

Christianity, Religion

“Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. For by it the people of old received their commendation. By faith we understand that the universe was created by the word of God, so that what is seen was not made out of things that are visible.” ‭‭ Hebrews‬ ‭11:1-3‬

“And all these, though commended through their faith, did not receive what was promised, since God had provided something better for us, that apart from us they should not be made perfect.” Hebrews‬ ‭11:39-40‬

“Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.” Hebrews‬ ‭12:1-2‬ ‭

The Letter to the Hebrews is a beautifully-written piece of Christian theology and doctrine. Though there are numerous speculations as to who its author was, the true identity is still unknown. What is known, however, is the purpose for which this letter was written. In the years following Christ’s ascension into Heaven, there was the belief that His return would be imminent. However, as time carried on, and Christ had yet to return, some Jewish believers began to think that maybe Jesus had not been the promised Messiah. These people began to go back into their old rituals and practices and started to once again wait for the coming of the Messiah. The author of Hebrews, determined to correct this fallacy and “falling away” (Hebrews 6:4-5), gives detailed teaching about the Jewish rituals and observances, and how Christ fulfilled all of these things in His life and death. The author of Hebrews uses the traditions and teachings of the Old Testament to make the fact that Jesus is the Messiah crystal clear.

In chapter eleven of Hebrews, this systematic approach of teaching through the Old Testament is on full display. In this chapter, the author highlights the importance of faith, and how it was by faith that the heroes and heroines of the ancient days, of the Old Testament, were gained their approval from God, and it was through a life of faith that they bore witness of God. It was by faith, by the “assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things unseen” (Hebrews 11:1) that the people of old lived; they never saw God in the flesh, and many of them never lived to see God’s promises to them fulfilled, yet they trusted in God nonetheless. The writer of Hebrews goes through the Old Testament, person-by-person, to demonstrate how the figures in this “ Hall of Faith” lived out their faith in God, regardless of the cost. For some, like Noah and Abraham, this life of faith did not cost them their lives. For many of the prophets, their faith in God cost them everything: “Some were tortured, refusing to accept release, so that they might rise again to a better life. Others suffered mocking and flogging, and even chains and imprisonment.  They were stoned, they were sawn in two, they were killed with the sword. They went about in skins of sheep and goats, destitute, afflicted, mistreated— of whom the world was not worthy” (Hebrews 11:35-38). None of the people mentioned by the author of Hebrews received what was promised to them in their lifetime–they did not live to see their inhabitants become a great nation or live to see the coming of the Messiah–and yet they persisted in their faith, knowing that God would keep His promise in His time.

Where Hebrews 11 ends with those who did not live to see God’s promises come into fulfillment, Hebrews 12 begins with those who are living after the coming of Jesus the Messiah. Though the promise of the Messiah has been fulfilled, we must still live a life of faith. We must always press forward in life toward the promise of eternal life with God in His Kingdom. The heroes and heroines of the Old Testament, that “great cloud of witnesses” (Hebrews 12:1), surround us and they have modeled for us how we are to live. We are to live as they did; with our eyes to the future and our faith firmly rooted in God. Christ, who is the author and perfecter of our faith, is now seated at the right hand of God. Since He endured our shame and punishment, He has enabled us to continue in the race that is life, and through our faith in Him, we can put aside the sins which so easily trip us up and drag us down. 

As we run our race, we must keep our eyes focused on Christ–as those of old focused on God the Father–because without Him and His help, we cannot finish the race. The race before us is not a sprint; it is a marathon. It is a race that will push us to our very limits; it is a race that will be long and arduous. Like those of old, our race might end painfully, and it might end without us seeing all of God’s promises coming into fruition. But as the Apostle Paul wrote in Philippians 1:21, “to live is Christ, to die is gain.” While we live, we run the race that is before us; when we die, our race is done, and we are with Him.

Our lives today are just as much rooted in faith– rooted in the “assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things unseen”–as were the lives of those in the Old Testament. We have not seen God, nor have we seen Christ. While we can look back at our individual lives before Christ saved us, and see how God worked in us and changed us, it is our faith that lets us know that the things that happened were done by God and not by chance or karma. It is by faith that we believe the Bible to be true. It is by faith in the hope that there is a better life to come that we continue forward–sometimes trudging–in this life. Most importantly, it is by faith in Christ, in Christ alone, that we are saved.

Those who came before us lived by faith, so too must we. Those who came before us left us a witness and a model to live by, we must do the same for those who will come after us. We can only do this by keeping our eyes focused on Jesus. We can only live by faith.

Draw courage from those who went before you. Keep your eyes on Christ. Live by faith. Leave a witness for those who come after you.

Artwork: Marc Chagall Tapestry in the Knesset, Israeli Parliament, c. 1960-1970