No More.

Bible, Christian Living, Christianity, Hebrews

“For by one sacrifice he has made perfect forever those who are being made holy.” Hebrews 10:14

No More Sacrifices (vv.11-13)

The author opens this passage by presenting us with a description of the high priests. We are told the priests are standing in the tabernacle every day, performing the same sacrifices again and again. The reason for this repetition is simple: the animal sacrifices that the priests offered were not enough to fix our sinful natures. Because of this, the priests’ work never ended. They had to continually stand and offer sacrifices that would act as temporary fixes for our sins.

All of this changes with Christ. After Jesus offered Himself as the perfect, once-and-for-all sacrifice, He proved definitively that the work of atonement was completed by sitting down. Christ sat down to show no more work had to be done, or sacrifices to be made, to accomplish our salvation. The author reminds us that Christ sat down at God’s right hand, and it is there where He sits today, advocating on our behalf before the Father.

No More Sinful Natures (14-16)

God promised the prophet Jeremiah that there would come a day when He would make a new covenant with His people and give them new hearts. God said that He would write His law upon these new hearts and remember the sins of His people no more. The author of Hebrews has made it quite clear that Christ’s death was the beginning of this new covenant, and that His sacrifice has allowed us to obtain these new hearts. By being the perfect sacrifice, Christ removed our sinful natures, and He covers us in His righteousness so that we can be justified before God. The author is quick to remind us, though, that while the work of our salvation has been completed, the work of making us holy (sanctification) is an ongoing process. Sanctification is a process that we will be going through for the rest of our lives, but it is a necessary part of Christian life. It is through this daily process that we become more and more molded and conformed to the will of Christ, and better able to live as His people.

No More Shame (17-18)

The most wonderful news the author presents to us in this passage is the news that we have no more shame. Earlier in chapter 10, we read that the old covenant sacrifices served to continually remind the people of their sins and shame. This was intentional, for God wanted to point us toward the new covenant that was coming. The author of Hebrews quotes from Jeremiah 31 to remind us of the glorious news that we have no more shame under the new covenant. Once we have been saved and our sins are forgiven, God remembers our transgressions no more. Christ bore all of our sins and our shame upon the cross. He took those things away from us to free us from the feeling of worthlessness and hopelessness that shame gives us. Now, as believers, we have a new identity in Christ, one that has been made spotless and pure by His blood. Because of Christ’s sacrifice, we are no longer defined by our shame; we are instead defined by His righteousness.

The news presented by the author to us is incredible, but it is also demanding. Christ has done so much for us: He has taken away our sin and shame, He has justified us, and He has begun sanctifying us. As such, we must live differently. We must be conformed every day to His will. The sanctification process assures us of our salvation. With that in mind, we must evaluate our lives and be sure that the life we are leading is a life that is being molded to Christ’s will.

Artwork: “Jesus, Man of Sorrows,” Peter Howson, 2006

Christ’s Obedience, Our Salvation.

Bible, Christianity, Religion

“He then says, ‘See, I have come to do Your will.’ He takes away the first to establish the second. By this will of God, we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once and for all.” Hebrews 10:9-10 

In Hebrews 10, we see the author of Hebrews continuing to discuss the superiority of Jesus’ sacrifice to those of the old covenant. In this passage, the author tells us that the blood of bulls and goats cannot take our sins away. The inferiority of the old sacrifices was demonstrated by the fact that they had to be renewed each year. Had these sacrifices been able to cure us of our sin, the author tells us that there would have been no need for them to be renewed again and again. Repeating the sacrifices each year served only to remind the people of their sins and their need for a savior.

To further support this point, the author quotes Psalm 40, in which the Messiah is speaking to God. In that passage, the Messiah says, “You did not want sacrifice and offering…You did not delight in whole burnt offerings and sin offerings,” ( 5-6). This means that God takes no pleasure in the ritualism and methods of our worship; there is something more meaningful to God that He takes pleasure in. What is it, then, that God prefers more than our rituals? It is our obedience. This is demonstrated by Christ; He came into this world with one purpose: to do God’s will. Christ never strayed from doing God’s will, even when doing so required Christ to die on the cross. Christ was perfectly obedient, and His commitment to obedience allowed the new covenant to be enacted. Christ’s obedience saved us and freed us from the cycle of sin and shame that we were stuck in under the Law.

What does this mean for us? It means that our lives must be committed to obeying God. If we profess to be followers of Christ, then we must be like Christ, and we cannot begin to be like Christ if we are not obeying God in every area of our lives. As Christians, our sole motivation and purpose must be to obey God and live as He has called us to live. Obedience is the hallmark of an authentic follower. We must make sure that our actions, thoughts, views, and interactions reflect our obedience to Christ. Our actions reveal our hearts, and nothing will expose the inauthentic follower than a lack of obedience. God doesn’t desire our sacrifices, songs, or good works–He wants our hearts and obedience. Are we giving that to Him?

Artwork: “Christ’s Entry in Jerusalem,” Hippolyte Flandrin, c. 1842

No Blood, No Forgiveness.

Bible, Christianity, Hebrews, Religion

“According to the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness.” Hebrews 9:22

In Hebrews 9:15-22, we read as the author continues to unpack how Christ enacted the new covenant for us. We are told that Christ is the mediator of the new covenant, meaning that Christ is the medium or the avenue through which God chose to bring this new covenant to humanity. In many ways, the author’s argument here echoes Christ’s own words in John 14:6 when He said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No man comes to the Father but by me.”  The author intends for us to understand that Christ is the way God brought salvation and the new covenant to humanity and that Christ is the only way that humanity can return to God.

The author then explains a point that is fundamental to our faith, that being the necessity of Christ’s death. The author is emphatic in communicating to us that Christ had to die in order for us to have salvation. First, we are told that the new covenant is like a last will, and for a will to be enacted, the one who made the will has to die. Without the death of the will-maker, the will has no power or authority. Since Christ is the mediator and guarantor of the new covenant, His death was required for this new covenant/will to come into effect. Without Christ’s blood, the new covenant would have no authority and no power to save.

As the author explains the necessity of Christ’s death, we are presented with one of the most important verses in all of Scripture. In Hebrews 9:22 the author writes,  “According to the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness.” This verse explains to us everything we need to know about God’s plan to redeem humanity. We see this illustrated throughout the Old Testament–God gave Israel the sacrificial system to allow them a way to be forgiven of their sins. Though this system seems barbaric and grotesque to us, it was designed to show us God’s mercy and grace. The truth of the matter is this: the penalty for sin is death. For us to be forgiven of our sins, something has to die in our place. Something has to die to atone–to cover–the sins that we have committed. In the system of the old covenant, God allowed animals to take our place. The blood of a lamb or a calf could pay our sin-debt. But these sacrifices had to be offered every time we sinned, and they did nothing to fix our sinful hearts or our sinful nature. God, in His infinite love and mercy, sent us the perfect sacrifice. He sent us a sacrifice that could atone for all of our sins for all of time, and He sent us a sacrifice that would actually transform us from the sinful creatures that we are. That sacrifice was His son, Jesus. But, for that atonement to be made, Christ had to die. Without Christ’s death, without His blood, there would be no forgiveness and no pardon. Without His blood, we would still be condemned to death.

In Hebrews 9, it becomes absolutely clear that there is no other avenue to salvation, other than Christ. He came to earth and blazed a trail for us back to God. That trail, however, is covered in His blood. The only way we can return to God is if we submit to Christ and are covered in His blood. His blood purchased our pardon and our salvation, and without His blood, there is no forgiveness or hope.

Artwork: “Crucifixion II” Stephen Oliver, 2011 (in the style of Graham Sutherland).

How Much More Will the Blood of Christ?

Bible, Christianity, Hebrews

“For if the blood of goats and bulls and the ashes of a young cow sprinkled on those who are defiled consecrated them and provided ritual purity, how much more will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our consciences from dead works to worship the living God.”  Hebrews 9:13-14

Through chapters eight and nine of Hebrews, we have seen the author discuss the old and new covenants. Most of this discussion has come by contrasting the two covenants–by focusing on the things that the old covenant could not do and alluding to the new covenant correcting these shortcomings. With all of its regulations and rituals, the old covenant was not designed to give us salvation. Instead, the old covenant pointed us to the God who, out of grace and mercy, gives us salvation.

Beginning in Hebrews 9:11, the author tells us how the new covenant was enacted and how it fixes us. We are told very emphatically that everything has changed with Christ’s arrival, and that His coming to the world signaled the arrival of the new covenant. We see that Christ does four things: He came, He passed through the veil into the true tabernacle, He entered the Most Holy Place, and He secured eternal redemption. Christ enacted this new covenant by passing through the true heavenly tabernacle and entering directly into God’s presence in heaven. Christ’s actions–passing through the tabernacle, entering into the Most Holy Place–are the same actions performed by the high priest on the Day of Atonement. However, Christ’s actions are more significant and more powerful. The priests work in the earthly tabernacle, but Christ works in the real tabernacle in heaven. Not only that, but Christ’s work of atonement for us and the purchasing of our salvation is eternal. The author says that Christ’s actions are “once and for all,” meaning that they never need to be renewed or repeated. The same could not be said for the atonement made by the high priests since they had to repeat the same ceremony year after year. 

The covenant made by Christ is eternal, and His sacrifices cleanse us of our sins. He does for us what the old covenant never could–He fixes the problem of our sinful nature. The cleansing rituals of the old covenant only gave us external relief, but they could not fix our hearts. Through the Holy Spirit, Christ purges us of our sins, and He declares us clean. He gives us new hearts and new natures that seek Him instead of seeking sin. Christ makes us alive and able to worship the living God, and Christ frees us from the dead works and rituals of the old covenant. 

Christ does for us what nothing else could; He frees us from our sins and our sinful natures. Through Him, we are enabled to live as the people of God.  Being washed in His blood and being transformed by Him requires our lives to reflect this change.  If our lives do not reflect the transformation we have experienced, we must repent, and we must allow Him to free us from the sins to which we so foolishly cling.

Artwork: “Crucifixion,” Graham Sutherland OM, 1946

Outwardly Clean, Spiritually Dead.

Bible, Christianity, Hebrews

“But the high priest alone enters the second room, and he does that only once a year, and never without blood, which he offers for himself and for the sins of the people committed in ignorance.  The Holy Spirit was making it clear that the way into the most holy place had not yet been disclosed while the first tabernacle was still standing.  This is a symbol for the present time, during which gifts and sacrifices are offered that cannot perfect the worshiper’s conscience. They are physical regulations and only deal with food, drink, and various washings imposed until the time of restoration.” Hebrews 9:7-10

In the outset of Hebrews 9, we find the author discussing the differences between the old and new covenants. To help us recognize and better understand these differences, the author goes into a detailed discussion of the tabernacle structure and the ancient Israelite worship regulations. This might seem to be an unusual approach, but the author does so to prove to us two crucial points. First, the author wants us to understand that, under the old covenant, we had no direct access to God. Secondly, the author wants us to realize that the old covenant’s regulations were never enough to give us salvation.
In verses 1-8, the author describes the tabernacle’s layout, the items inside the tabernacle, and the high priests’ duties on the Day of Atonement. The author explains these things to show us why we need a new covenant with God. Under the regulations of the old covenant, we had no direct access to God. There was always a barrier between Him and us, and this is illustrated by the veil within the tabernacle. The veil separated the Holy of Holies from the rest of the tabernacle. Though the tabernacle represented God’s presence with Israel, His space was isolated and cut-off from the people. No one could enter into the Holy of Holies on their own terms and approach God’s presence. Even the high priest was prohibited from going into God’s space other than on the Day of Atonement. There was no way for humanity to approach God other than the ways God prescribed.
Under the terms of the old covenant, we were separated from God. This is not because God was uncaring or aloof; instead, it was for our protection. Humanity needed this separation and needed these worship regulations so that we would not haphazardly approach God. We are sinful beings, and God cannot be in the presence of sin. His nature is so perfectly holy that His presence would kill us if we were to approach Him while still infected with sin. But because God loves us, and because He wants to draw us near to Him, He showed us how we could have a relationship with Him. He gave Israel the Law to show them how they could appropriately worship Him and live accordingly as His people. The Law provided a path to follow so that Israel could survive with God in their midst.
But there was a problem with the Law, and the author of Hebrews points this out to us. The Law only dealt with external things; it did nothing to change our hearts or change our sinful nature. The offerings and regulations of the Law could not give us clean hearts or clear consciences. Something better had to come; a better sacrifice and a better covenant had to be given so that our hearts would be changed. Something had to change so that we could have direct access to God. All of these things would be achieved in Christ.
Christ has done away with the divide between God and us. Christ has gone behind the veil and given us direct access to the Father. Christ has given us His righteousness so that we can freely and boldly approach the Father whenever we need to do so. Now, when we approach the Father, God no longer sees sinners deserving of condemnation and wrath. Because of Christ, the Father now sees us as His children, who have been redeemed and bought by Christ’s blood.
Christ gives us the direct access to God that we needed. Christ changes us so that we may approach the Father with reverence, but without fear. Most importantly, Christ enables us to live as the people of God. No Law could ever do that; none of our works could ever achieve this. Only Christ and His blood could do this for us. Because of this, we must stop trusting in things other than Christ, and we must put the entirety of our hope and faith in Christ alone.

Artwork: skeleton image by Adreas Veselius from his “Fabric of the Human Body,” 1543.

Blueprint of a Better Covenant.

Bible, Christianity, Hebrews

“Now the point in what we are saying is this: we have such a high priest, one who is seated at the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in heaven, a minister in the holy places, in the true tent that the Lord set up, not man.” Hebrews‬ ‭8:1-2‬ ‭

In Hebrews 8, we see the author’s focus shift toward discussing the new covenant that Christ enacted for us. The author tells us that Christ is qualified to be the high priest of this new covenant because He serves in the true tabernacle in heaven, and not in the earthly tabernacle which is only a “sketch and a shadow” of its heavenly counterpart. The earthly tabernacle serves only to give us a glimpse of what we will see when we are in God’s presence in heaven.

In this same fashion, God’s old covenant with Israel is but a sketch, or a blueprint, of the covenant that He would make with us through Christ. To support this position, the author quotes Jeremiah 31, a passage in which God explains the new covenant’s coming. But before we can understand the new covenant, we must first understand the old covenant that preceded it.

After God freed Israel from slavery in Egypt, He led them to Mt. Sinai. At Sinai, God gave Israel the Law, and He told them that He had called them to be His people and that He would be their God. Israel would show their commitment to keeping the covenant by keeping God’s commandments. But this proved to be a problem, for Israel could never live up to these terms. They were never able to live according to God’s standard. As soon as they settled in the Promised Land, there arose a generation who did not know the Lord. From there, the situation only became worse. With each generation, Israel strayed further and further from the Lord. By the prophet Jeremiah’s time, God had decided it was time to make a new covenant.

In Jeremiah 31, the passage that the author of Hebrews quotes from, God tells Jeremiah that this new covenant would not be like the previous one, it would be better. God ensured that the new covenant would be better by vowing to fix the old covenant’s major flaw—us. Israel could never keep the law and keep the covenant because of their fallen nature. They were sinful beings, just the same as we are today. They couldn’t keep the law because their sinful nature made them incapable of doing so.

But God would do something different in the new covenant; He would change us. To ensure the success of the new covenant, God would change our human nature. He would give us new hearts upon which He has written His law. He would fill us with His spirit, and He would make us capable of living up to His standard and being His people. When God brings us to Himself through Christ, He makes us new creatures who seek only Him.

Living as the people of God requires us to be incredibly honest about what is in our hearts. We cannot be God’s people if we are still holding on to things from our old lives and from our old, sinful hearts. We must thoroughly examine our hearts, and if we see that we are holding on to sin, we must humbly go before God and ask for His forgiveness. We must pray that He remove that sin from us, and we must ask that He give us the strength we need to live as He calls us to live.

Guaranteed To Be Better.

Bible, Christianity, Hebrews

“So Jesus has also become the guarantee of a better covenant.”  Hebrews 7:22.

There are so very few guarantees in life. In this world, things break, become obsolete, or fail to live up to our expectations. Because of this, we often demand quality guarantees, money-back guarantees, repairs guaranteed, or even satisfaction guarantees. We recognize just how temporary things are in this life, and we are constantly looking for reassurance and peace of mind that things will be repaired or corrected when everything in our lives begin to fall apart. Try as we might, we cannot find in this world anything that will give us the hope and comfort that we are searching for. We can find nothing that comes close to the sort of guarantee we so desperately crave.

Or can we?

At the end of Hebrews 7, the author reveals to us that there is a guarantee that will give us hope, comfort, confidence, and peace of mind. It is the salvation guarantee that God gives us through Jesus. 

The author has been building to this point throughout Hebrews, and especially in chapter seven. We have seen how Christ is superior to the priests of Levi and Aaron. We have seen how the Law and the priesthood were designed to make us understand how dependent we are upon God’s mercy, and how these things point us to the Gospel and to Christ. We have seen that we are under a new Law–the Law of Grace–and that we now have a new priesthood with a new high priest, who is none other than Christ. 

At the end of chapter seven, the author reveals to us why God has enacted all these new things; the author finally tells us what this is all building up to. The author tells us that God has created a new covenant, and that this new covenant would be the one through which He redeems the world and brings humanity back to Himself.

To prove that this new covenant was superior to the old covenant, God sent us Christ. Jesus is the guarantee that this covenant is the final covenant, the perfect covenant. By shedding His blood to atone for us, Christ sealed this guarantee. God gave us His word that this covenant would bring us back to Him, and Christ delivered upon this guarantee by giving His life for us. 

God has given us the only guarantee that we will ever need. He has guaranteed our salvation, but this guarantee is only valid for those who place their faith and trust in Christ. Jesus is the only one through whom people can come to God. With this guarantee from God, we have all the hope and comfort we could ever desire. Why would we dare seek guarantees anywhere else?

Artwork: “Suffering of Jesus,” Vladomir Stevanoic

A Better Priesthood.

Bible, Christianity, Hebrews

“So the previous command is annulled because it was weak and unprofitable (for the law perfected nothing), but a better hope is introduced, through which we draw near to God.” Hebrews 4:18-19

After re-introducing us to Melchizedek in 7:1-3, the author of Hebrews spends the next several verses explaining Melchizedek’s superiority to Abraham. The author’s argument is this: if the author could demonstrate that Melchizedek was superior to Abraham, it would follow that Melchizedek was also superior to Levi and Aaron. With that being the case, the author could also explain how Melchizedek’s priesthood was superior to those of Levi and Aaron.
How did the author explain that Melchizedek was superior to Abraham? There are two pieces of evidence in the Genesis account that the author used. The first bit of evidence presented was that Abraham gave Melchizedek a tithe of the spoil from killing the kings of Canaan. Abraham did this out of homage and respect for Melchizedek. The author also reminded the readers that this act of tithing is just what the Israelites would later do for their own priests. They were legally required to give ten percent of their goods to the priests to support them, and this tithe was given out of respect for the work that the priests did. Secondly, the author points out that Melchizedek blessed Abraham. The author tells us that only a blessing can only be given by a person of superior standing. A person of lesser status cannot bless someone greater than themselves. For Melchizedek to bless Abraham, both he and Abraham would have to know that Melchizedek was the more important person.
So, how does Melchizedek’s superiority to Abraham relate to the Israelite priesthood? According to the author, if Melchizedek was superior to Abraham, he was also superior to Levi and Aaron. This would mean that Melchizedek’s priesthood was more significant than Levi and Aaron’s as well. This is a vital point because it reveals that the Law and the priests could not make salvation complete. These institutions were merely designed to point us toward the Gospel and toward the greatest high priest, Jesus Christ.
The author spends so much time explaining this to understand that only Christ can give us salvation. Christ alone is sufficient for our salvation. There is nothing that we can do on our own for salvation, and there is nothing that another human can do for us. Only Christ can do the work of atonement that we need. There is nothing we can do, and there is nothing that we can add to the work that He has already done. So we must put all of our trust and hope in Christ, and in Christ alone.

Artwork: “Aaron the High Priest,” William Etty (1878-1849).

The Priest-King.

Bible, Christianity, Hebrews

“For this Melchizedek—

King of Salem, priest of the Most High God,
who met Abraham and blessed him
as he returned from defeating the kings,
and Abraham gave him a tenth of everything;
first, his name means king of righteousness,
then also, king of Salem,
meaning king of peace;
without father, mother, or genealogy,
having neither beginning of days nor end of life,
but resembling the Son of God—

remains a priest forever.” Hebrews 7:1-3

In Hebrews 7, the author continues the discussion about Christ being our high priest. To help make this case, the author points to the Old Testament figure Melchizedek. As the author of Hebrews wisely observes, Melchizedek allows us to see how the Messiah can be both a king and a priest, without coming from the priestly family of Levi and Aaron.


Melchizedek is a very mysterious figure. He only appears in two verses in the Book of Genesis (14:18-20). In these two verses, we are told several things about Melchizedek. We are told that he is the King of Salem, the priest of the Most High God, and he blesses Abraham. He presents Abraham with bread and wine. Though this might all seem like trivial information, the author of Hebrews draws from this information and shows us how these things point us toward Jesus.


The author of Hebrews spends a lot of time talking about Melchizedek’s name and his position as the King of Salem. His name, Melchizedek, means “King of Righteousness,” which gives us a vital clue about his character. Along with this, we know that Melchizedek ruled over a significant city–Salem, which would later be renamed Jerusalem. We know Jerusalem is important because it is where God would locate His temple; it would be where God chose to dwell among His people. In Genesis, before the temple was constructed, and before Israel was created, we see that Melchizedek, the King of Righteousness, is the ruler of this holy city. We are also reminded that the name “Salem” means “peace,” which adds another layer to this interesting figure. Not only is Melchizedek the King of Righteousness and the King of Salem, but he is also the King of Peace. His titles, and his actions of laying out bread and wine, foreshadow an even greater king, Jesus–the King of Kings–and the work that He would do in Jerusalem.


As amazing as all of this already is, the author of Hebrews points our attention to something else. We are reminded that Melchizedek is not only a king, but he is a priest. He belongs to a priesthood that predates Levi and Aaron, which means Melchizedek’s priesthood is not confined to a particular family. God appointed Melchizedek to this priesthood, and this is the priesthood that God would also appoint Jesus to. This allows Jesus to be, like Melchizedek, both a priest and a king. Jesus comes from the royal family of Judah and David, and He was appointed by God to be in the priestly order of Melchizedek (Psalm 110:4).


Though he only appears very briefly in the Bible, Melchizedek helps us better understand how God mapped out His plan of salvation down to the smallest detail. Melchizedek shows us how Christ can be the Messiah who is both king and priest. Since Christ is both priest and king, he can perform the duties of both offices. He can offer the sacrifice of atonement to save us from our sins, and He can also rule over us and direct us in how we should live. Christ is worthy to save us, and He is worthy to rule over us, and because of this, we must live worthy of the call He has placed upon us.

Artwork: Icon of Abraham meeting Melchizedek

Promises, Promises.

Christianity, Hebrews, Religion
Gravestone St. Domitilla catacomb in Rome depicting two fish anchored to the anchor of hope. Courtesy of https://earlychurchhistory.org/

“Because God wanted to show His unchangeable purpose even more clearly to the heirs of the promise, He guaranteed it with an oath, so that through two unchangeable things, in which it is impossible for God to lie, we who have fled for refuge might have strong encouragement to seize the hope set before us. We have this hope as an anchor for our lives, safe and secure.” Hebrews 6:17-19

In Hebrews 6, we read some of the author’s most reassuring words. These words of hope and comfort come in the middle of a discussion of the eternal and unchanging nature of God’s promises. Here, we see the author demonstrate how faithful God is to keep His promises by using Abraham’s example. We are reminded of how God kept His promise to bless Abraham with many descendants. This stands as a reminder to us that God will also keep His promises to us.

What are the promises that God is going to keep to us? They are His promises to redeem us from sin, to offer us forgiveness, to make us His people. They include Christ’s promises to never leave us nor forsake us, to be with us each and every day until the end of time, and to return for us to take us to be with Him in heaven. These are the promises that will be kept to us. The author reminds us that these promises give us hope and that they anchor our souls.

The imagery of an anchor is especially important in this passage. Think about what an anchor is used for–they used to keep a boat from being blown off course or blown into danger during a storm. When the seas rage and the storms overwhelm the boat, the anchor holds the boat steady. This is what Christ does for us; He holds us steady during life’s trials and troubles. He is with us in the midst of the storms. Our anchor is securely fastened to His throne of mercy, and He secured it there when He blazed a trail through the heaven. Regardless of what we might encounter in this life, our anchor will hold firmly.

It is important to point out that Christ did not promise us smooth sailing, nor did He promises is a comfortable life. Christ did not promise us health, wealth, or prosperity. Christ did not promise us happiness. Many people started believing these things along the way, but these are not promises that Christ ever made. These are lies that were fabricated by false teachers.

The promises that Christ made are more important and more incredible than comfortable living, health, wealth, prosperity, and happiness. He promised to be with us and to hold us amid life’s storms. He called upon us to be willing to give up our health, wealth, and prosperity for His sake, and in return, He promised to sustain us and provide for us each and every day. Christ has promised to bring us peace and comfort during the times when we have no happiness, when we are surrounded by pain and sorrow, and when our tears are drowning us. He has promised to give us a joy that endures even the darkest days. Christ promised to anchor us throughout everything we endure, and this promise will never be broken.